The”New Breed” of African Leaders: US Backed War and Mayhem in the Heart Africa

Friends of the Congo in collaboration with the People’s Forum, Black Star News and the African Great Lakes Action Network invite you to an evening of film screening and discussion about the United States role in supporting authoritarian leaders in East and Central Africa.

ny screening dec 13 ABG

The evening will begin with a screening of “A Brilliant Genocide” By Ebony Butler. The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the following panelists and moderator: Register here for free
Helen Epstein, Author of Another Fine Mess, America, Uganda and the War on Terror
Judi Rever, Author, In Praise of Blood: The Crimes of the Rwandan Patriotic Front
Milton Allimadi, Publisher Black Star News
Claude Gatebuke, Director, African Great Lakes Action Network
Kambale Musavuli, Spokesperson, Friends of the Congo

Moderator: Professor Tiffany Wheatland-Disu – Teaches African history in the Africana Studies Department, John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY)

For more information, please call 202-584-6512 or send email to info@friendsofthecongo.org.

Co-sponsors: Africa in Harlem, Safaru Yangu, Pan African Unity Dialogue, Africa News in Brief, Tabilulu Productions and Amnesty International Bronx Chapter

DATE AND TIME

Thu, December 13, 2018

6:00 PM – 10:00 PM EST

Add to Calendar

 

LOCATION

TRYP HOTEL NYC TIMES SQUARE SOUTH

345 W 35th St

New York, NY 10001

United States

View Map

A Brilliant Genocide / Another Fine Mess
Film Screening and Book Release Talk

Date:  October 4, 2017 – 6:00pm8:00pm
Location:  International Affairs Building 1501
In honor of the release of SIPA adjunct professor Helen Epstein’s new book, Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda and the War on Terror, the SIPA Economic and Political Development will be hosting a book talk combined with a screening of the 2016 documentary film A Brilliant Genocide, on the Ugandan government’s crimes against its own people in the northern region of the country.
Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs are screening the documentary which will be followed by a panel discussion featuring:
Helen C. Epstein, whose Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda and the War on Terror explores the US relationship with Uganda’s Yoweri Museveni and his involvement in five violent conflicts that erupted shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall in the Horn and Great Lakes regions of Africa. She teaches at Bard College and Columbia’s School of Public and International Affairs and writes frequently for the New York Review of Books and other publications.
Ogenga Otunnu, an Associate Professor of History at DePaul University whose two volume study, Crisis of Legitimacy and Political Violence in Uganda (Palgrave 2016,2017) is the only academic work covering Uganda’s entire history. He is an expert on the causes and consequences of forced migration, humanitarian emergencies and Africa and Black Diaspora studies.
Milton Allimadi, who teaches at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and is publisher of Black Star News. He comes from Uganda and appears in A Brilliant Genocide.
Date: 
October 4, 2017 – 6:00pm – 8:00pm
 
Location:
 

Columbia University
School of International and Public Affairs
Room 1501
420 W 118th St #1410
New York, NY 10027

ABG POSTER 1b black LIFF2016 NEW 02 sat 11 june.jpg

We are honoured to be included in the year’s official selection at the Lighthouse International Film Festival, on Longbeach Island, New Jersey.

This will be the last screening until late August in Moscow. Don’t miss out.

We also have an expert panel joining us after the screening to answer any questions and to offer their expert views.

PANELISTS INCLUDE:

Milton Allimadi
Allimadi who is also featured in ‘A Brilliant Genocide’ is the Ugandan born editor of www.blackstarnews.com and www.burkinastyle.com and also writes a column for www.huffingtonpost.com His late father was a Ugandan politician and his family fled from Idi Amin’s and then Yoweri Museveni’s reigns of terror.

Kiwanuka Lawrence Nsereko
Nsereko is a Ugandan journalist, political activist, freedom fighter and now U.S.-based professor. He was incarcerated and tortured by the Yoweri Museveni dictatorship before escaping the country.
Helen Epstein
Epstein’s articles on human rights and public health in Uganda and other African countries have appeared in The New York Review of BooksThe New York TimesThe Lancet and other publications. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight against AIDS in Africa (Picador 2008) and has conducted research for Human Rights Watch, UNICEF and other organizations. She teaches at Bard College in Annandale, New York.

 

Info and tickets at : http://liff.festivalgenius.com/2016/films/abrilliantgenocide0_ebonybutler_LIFF2016

Our documentary A Brilliant Genocide  which exposes the  Museveni‬ government for atrocities in Northern Uganda is screening next week in Los Angeles.

A Brilliant Genocide was chosen with another 60 films to be included in the Official Selection for this years Cinema at the Edge Independent Film Festival.

The screening will take place on Saturday the 21st of May at 9pm, in Santa Monica’s Edgar Centre for the Arts. Change is coming to ‪#‎Uganda‬ and justice is too. Join us.

ABG POSTER 1a CATE16

The Cinema at the Edge in Santa Monica, CA is one of the “Top 10 destination film festivals in the world,” Our film festival screens over 60 films, mostly by new filmmakers and rising stars. Come and join this Los Angeles film festival.

Cinema at the Edge Film Festival (CATE) celebrates independent films of all genres that feature a distinct vision, a unique voice, or a challenge to what is expected and accepted in the medium. Submit your film and join us for great movies, panels, parties, and more!

TICKETS    Click Here  

(more…)

SIGN THE PETITION HERE

Cut Off U.S. Weapons To Gen Museveni Uganda’s Murderous Dictator:

Dear President Obama,

As you know on Feb. 18 Uganda held elections that were universally condemned by credible observers including by the U.S. as flawed and having not been free, fair or credible; they were also marred by violence against opposition leaders and their supporters by state security agents.

The Ugandan military has since escalated its human rights abuses by inflicting brutal repression against civilians.

The U.S., which is a major security partner of the Ugandan regime, providing arms and training for its army – in addition to $700 million in financial support — must at the very least suspend this relationship as required by the Leahy Amendment which “prohibits the U.S. Department of State and Department of Defense from providing military assistance to foreign military units that violate human rights with impunity.”

With respect to the Feb. 18 vote, former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo condemned the Ugandan regimes’ vote suppression in opposition strongholds; he said the delays in delivery of election material were “inexcusable.”

Yoweri_Museveni_with_Obamas_2014
President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama greet His Excellency Yoweri Museveni, President of the Republic of Uganda, in the Blue Room during a U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit dinner at the White House, Aug. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

(more…)

See our new New Film Poster  for #ABrilliantGenocide ahead of our World Premiere ion March 11, Washington DC – as a part of the DC Independent Film Festival!

A4-ABG-Film-Poster

It is with pleasure and excitement that I announce the new title of our feature documentary… ‘A Brilliant Genocide.

ABG Logo 1
Pre-release teaser video from A Brilliant Genocide (scroll down) 

After 6 years filming, researching and editing this film, it has naturally evolved and transformed into a much different film that we set out to make in 2009 when it all began. 

We spent 3 years on the Joseph Kony / child soldier path – and the issue of children / child soldiers and other related  human rights abuses that are of much interest to us – we condemn the use of children in war, and the abuse of any child in any way, in any part of the world. 

However, the film is no longer 100% focused on the issue of children at war and Joseph Kony’s war in northern Uganda. The film remains very much connected with Kony and his use of child soldiers- but along our 6 year journey we found some completely untold ‘hidden’ stories that we felt were even more important to bring to light.

What we discovered and continue to discover, is that the world has been fooled, as I was 6 years ago, about Joseph Kony and his war in northern Uganda. There’s another side to this story that has never been told, and we have been on a journey for the past few years to find out the truth and the backstory that has received zero media attention – and even worse than that – the people responsible for these concealed human rights abuses, are those who have been supported by the west for 30 years, and who are still in office today. And the West is still today supporting the regime, while the regime continues to enjoy complete impunity for their crimes. 

We have discovered that Kony, although blamed for the war and the suffering, is just the tip of the ice-berg. We have found that Kony did have a reason, a very legitimate reason, for his rebellion, and although his acts of violence and child abductions are deplorable, and in no way justified – he has a reason for what he has done, and in his mind his actions are justified. The truth that no one who knows will admit – will bring many people – the bigger criminals and the puppeteers who have orchestrated this war and allowed it to continue – to account. The people we have spoken with call the situation in Uganda ‘a global conspiracy of silence’. And what we will be showing in our film is that indeed it has been, and sadly continues to be so today. 

(more…)

This is a short video clip (sneak peek only) from an interview with Adam Branch for our documentary, at Makerere University (Kampala, Uganda) earlier this year.

The interview touches on military intervention in the hunt for Joseph Kony and the LRA, in Uganda and neighbouring countries such as the DRC  (Democratic Republic of Congo) and CAR (Central African Republic).

Adam Branch is senior research fellow at the Makerere Institute of Social Research, Uganda, and assistant professor of political science at San Diego State University, USA. He is the author of Displacing Human Rights: War and Intervention in Northern Uganda. (http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/profile/adam-branch.html)

Follow our documentary and it’s production on:

Facebook at www.facebook.com/childtroopers and

Twitter at www.twitter.com/madvsbad

Here’s a snippet from an interview we did with Michael Kirkpatrick in Dallas, Texas

My second trip to Uganda was vastly different from the first, back in 2009.

In 2009, I was researching the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army), Joseph Kony and the topical issue of children in armed conflict. I spent most of my time with former child soldiers in Northern Uganda and also made a promise to a group of child soldiers that I had become close to. The promise was to send 2 bicycles, to help them in their lives and in their rehabilitation and re-integration into society.

In 2012, I returned with a container of 400 bicycles, a mission I had been on since my trip there in 2009. I also set up a bike workshop and vocational training centre at Friends of Orphans in Pader, to help victims of the conflict.

As as far as my research on the war in Northern Uganda goes, I had learnt a lot more in the three years since my first visit. During that period I also traveled to the United States, where I interviewed people at the United Nations, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Black Star News, UNICEF, Resolve Uganda and many other organizations.

My knowledge of the conflict grew day by day, and when I returned to Uganda earlier this year, I had many new contacts to meet and learn from. These included notable and die-hard pro-democracy activists such as Barbara Allimadi, Shawn Mubiru, Anne Mugisha, opposition leaders Kizza Besigye, Nandala Mafabi and the honorable UPC President and former UN Under Secretary General for Children in Armed Conflict, Dr. Olara Otunnu. The experts and scholars I met with included Adam Branch from Makerere University, Leander Komakech, Okello Okello John Livingstone and Major General Pecas Kutesa – who all offered interesting and informative insights into the war and the state of democracy in Uganda. This really put a new spin on my take of the conflict, which had gradually been happening since the U.S trip in 2011. There were things that didn’t add up and it has taken a long time to work out the truth, as the media portrayal of the conflict is far from the facts I had uncovered. Uganda, I also discovered, was a democracy in disguise. On two occasions I was almost arrested, for no reason other than having a camera and having friends who are with the opposition. On my last day in Uganda, the day I was grabbed by the Police and threatened to be tear gassed, my friend Doreen was actually arrested and put into maximum security prison (Luzira), for voicing her opinion about the government and Museveni’s corrupt regime. I can tell you first hand, Uganda is not as free and democratic as it appears to be…

I still spend countless hours researching the conflict and the human rights situation in the country, as what has occurred in Northern Uganda has been so well concealed by the powers that be, and the international community at large, making it very difficult for the truth to be made visually transparent. The ‘Kony War‘, as it is often called, is not what it seems. That is not to say that Kony does not exist, nor that he has not committed the atrocities that are now well-known to the world, thanks to the viral video campaign from Invisible Children, Kony 2012. The perpetrator of this conflict is not Kony, as most would believe due to media and government deception and misinformation. Joseph Kony is sadly a product of the war, and should still however be made to face justice for his crimes. But, will that bring justice to the Acholi people of Northern Uganda, particularly if the other perpetrators are not also made to stand trial for their involvement in this human tragedy? How can justice prevail when impunity reigns?

This year I also spent much time in Uganda looking into how the conflict can be resolved and what is the best way forward. Is military intervention (which is what is currently happening) the correct road, or could truth and reconciliation through national dialogue and peace talks be a better and more effective option? There are many differing views on this subject, but on the ground, there seems to be only one. Invisible Children have called out loud and clear for U.S military intervention in the region, but where has that got them in the past, and for what reasons would they really be intervening? The fact of the matter is, why intervene now, when they really needed to intervene 10 years ago, when there was a serious humanitarian crisis going on. That’s when everyone was silent on what was going on. That’s when help was needed and voices needed to be heard. Now there is relative peace and the people in Uganda want to know, “WHY NOW?”.

‘Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.’
Albert Einstein